Image for post
Image for post

COVID-19 has had a mammoth impact on the travel industry, with many businesses bankrupt and employees left without work. Border closures have hit the aviation industry hard. Fortunately, image recognition, machine learning, IoT, and location intelligence are creating new travel solutions changing the end-to-end passenger experience.

2020 will be known as the year where tourist flights died a thousand deaths. Airlines filed for bankruptcy, pilots and travel agents looked for new careers, borders closed, and many tourists were left stranded due to canceled flights. COVID-19 created the need for greater hygiene and people monitoring to reduce the spread of the…


Image for post
Image for post

Postman is a collaboration platform for API development. They recently released the results of its 2020 Postman State of the API Report. The annual report, the largest and most comprehensive survey of the API industry, surveyed more than 13,500 API developers, testers, executives, and others to understand who is working with APIs, how they are getting their work done, and where they see the industry headed.

I sat down with marketing executive Rebecca Johnston-Gilbert and KIn Lane Chief Evangelist at Postman to find out more and discuss some of the key findings from the survey.

Who works with APIs?

Survey-takers were asked about their…


Image for post
Image for post

Hackathons have had a long history of bringing people together to develop technological solutions in response to specific problems and challenges. Hackathons can be in-house, focused on a particular technology, a social issue, or policy challenge.

Over the last year, we’ve seen a shift from in-person events as COVID-19 has required extensive efforts to reduce the risk of exposure. While virtual events may lack the in-person experience, they present the opportunity to develop tremendous value and rapid innovation development.

Over merely days, teams can help deep dive on a specific problem and develop, test, and launch prototypes, which if successful…


Inclusive Design is about creating products that can be used by everyone. We take a look at what we can learn from product design.

Image of woman sitting at a table in a wheelchair in front of a laptop. The woman is smiling with her hand raised
Image of woman sitting at a table in a wheelchair in front of a laptop. The woman is smiling with her hand raised
Image by Marcus Aurelius

At any time, 20% of us will have a disability. It may be temporary, situational, or permanent. Inclusive Design is a methodology, born out of digital environments, that enables and draws on the full range of human diversity. Most importantly, this means including and learning from people with a range of perspectives.

Improving your product’s accessibility can enhance the usability for all users, including those with low vision, blindness, hearing impairments, cognitive impairments, motor impairments or situational disabilities (such as a broken arm).

Inclusive Design is about creating technology from websites to platforms, products and devices that can be used…


You’ve probably thought about securing smart devices such as cars and homes, but have you thought about securing space with blockchain technology? The increasing adoption of connected technologies exposes aircraft, airports, satellites, and the interdependent aerospace ecosystem to new types of risks. And it’s being taken extremely seriously.

Image for post
Image for post

This year’s DEFCON Safe Mode even had space security on the agenda. The US Air Force and DOD‘s Defense Digital Service hosted the Space Security Challenge 2020, a mixture of virtual workshops and prize challenges related to securing space systems, including a live capture-the-flag (CTF) style satellite hacking competition dubbed “Hack-A-Sat.” …


Despite their age, legacy mainframe languages like COBOL still power many Fortune 500 and Government departments.We take a deeper look at relevance.

Image for post
Image for post

The Common Business-Oriented Language (COBOL) is considered a legacy mainframe language. It was developed nearly 60 years ago and has been gradually replaced by newer, more versatile languages such as Java, C and Python. Few universities offer COBOL courses.

However, according to Reuters, in 2017, 43% of banking systems that are today still in use were built on COBOL and never replaced. Further, 80% of in-person transactions use COBOL, and 95% of ATM swipes rely on COBOL code.


With many organizations moving to virtual conferences, this creates a new challenge for many. We take a look at the best virtual conference tools.

Image for post
Image for post

In May, Codemotion held our first virtual conference — a deep dive into machine learning. Through planning the event, we’ve been able to test and explore a variety of different free and proprietary digital tools.

How we choose our virtual conference tools

Generally, what technical tools you use depends on your budget, the number of participants, duration of your event and general preferences –you may already have access to proprietary software for free bundled with services you already access.

It’s definitely worth asking around (everyone will have a favourite and a horror story about another offering they’ve tried). Test different services to find what works best for…


In this article we’ll learn more about inclusive design, and why it’s important to involve very diverse users during the design process.

Image for post
Image for post

An inclusive type of approach creates better solutions, because it aims to benefit all users, therefore also those who must cope with disabilities. Thinking in terms of accessibility throughout the entire process enables the creation of solutions for mobile applications and websites that are actually evolved and not merely alternative. Inclusive design makes possible a global kind of participation, with a higher impact on positivity exchange and emotional benefits than we would have when addressing just the disabilities.

Stefano Del Furia is the Director of Digital Innovation at Campus DaVinci and an enthusiastic adopter of C# and .NET since the…


We take a look at how remote work has changed workplaces for the future and created new challenges for companies new to remote work.

Image for post
Image for post

For those of us who have been working remotely for a long time, we approached the COVID-19 lockdown with less alarm than those who are in site-specific jobs, who lost their livelihood as their workplace shut down. We conducted a survey in the earlier stages of the pandemic regarding the impact of COVID-19 on developers and found that developer careers are largely pandemic proof and adaptable to multiple locations.

But it’s fair to say the world of work is forever changed, even for those of us already in roles where our primary tools are a laptop, chair, and decent WiFi…


Cloud computing persists as the backbone to many examples of digital transformation, although it’s still evolving and subject to numerous challenges.

Image for post
Image for post

Digital transformation is in abundance, thanks to the migration from mainframes to datacentres and the explosion of cloud (and edge) computing. Cloud computing is ubiquitous in today’s technology, and it would be hard to find a business that doesn’t use, provide, or create cloud services. Cloud computing offers fast, agile, inexpensive, and massively scalable Infrastructure. It’s responsible for a suite of new technologies and service innovations across many vertical.

For developers, this has resulted in a suite of technology and service innovations as industries have switched from on-premises architecture to cloud computing.

Containerization has grown in importance both an as…

Cate Lawrence

Tech journo and writer, based in Berlin, Germany.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store